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More Beaujolais ~ Oh Goodie! ~ Part II

My Beaujolais connection has done a Take II, because the first part of it was for the softer, more feminine Gamays.

This tasting was for the big boys, and here are the details:

Order of Wines to be Tasted

  1. Christophe Pacalet, Cote de Brouilly, 2006 ~ SRP: $16.99
    • This Côte de Brouilly, one of the 10 “Crus” of Beaujolais, is so beautifully concentrated and generous in fruit. I enjoyed the forward raspberry and dark cherry fruit. It had great body and would cellar beautifully for a few years. An unfiltered wine allowed for a lot of unctuous flavors.
    • Grape: 100% Gamay
    • SRP: $16.99
    • Importer: Winebow
  2. Pascal Granger, Juliénas, 2005
    • Medium dark to black ruby color… This wine’s descriptors say that it has a deeply expressive “mineral nose (powdered granite) with hard cherry/plum candy scents”. I couldn’t agree more. It was had softer, but more structured flavors that followed the nose. As with each of these wines, the balance was beautiful, and it had a lengthy, stone-filled finish. An old-style Beaujolais, it emphasized its texture, crisp fruit, and minerality.
    • Grape: 100% Gamay
    • Price: $23.99
    • Importer: Rosenthal Wine Merchant
  3. Loluis-Claude Desvignes, Morgon, 2007
    • A vividly red wine, the lively red currant and wild strawberry aromas were enhanced with rose hip flavors, minerals and white pepper. “The mineral quality adds energy to the sweet red fruit flavors and gives the wine nervy spine and precision. An exotic Asian spice quality comes up with air and carries through the long, juicy, clean finish.” our tech sheets expressed. I completely agree.
    • Grape: 100% Gamay
    • Price: $19.99
    • Importer: Louis/Dressner Selections
  4. Domaine Diochon, Moulin à Vent, 2008
    • Aromatically more open than a previous bottle, dark fruit mixed with shaved iron minerals.
      Initially nice mouth, balanced acidity, fruit, and ripe tannins. With about 90 minutes of air the
      fruit receded a bit and the structure became more prominent. This Beaujolais should easily age well for 5-8 years.

I’m enraptured with Beaujolais, and am ever grateful to Michelle McCudden, of the Social Media Group, for thinking enough of me to include me in this fabulous opportunity to taste, learn, and enjoy Beaujolais wines.

If you’re interested in subscribing to the Discover Beaujolais newsletter please visit discoverbeaujolais.com, and sign up, like I just did.

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